Book Review: Robert Moffat: The Story of a Great Missionary

Robert Moffat: The Story of a Great Missionary

By Hubert Williams

Published approx 1883 by National Sunday School Union

When I picked this book up at a car boot sale, I had no idea who Robert Moffat was, and although I admire missionaries, I know very little about them. The book was old, tired around the edges, yellow edged pages and fantastic plates illustrating the inside of the book. It was an old book, smelling of age, beautiful in its simplicity and naïve look, from a time long before e-books.

It was only £1, and loving all books and interested in Victorians, having recently finished Redvers Buller biography (see other review), I had to have it.

Robert Moffat (1795-1883) was a missionary and father in law to Dr Livingstone. He spent fifty years in Kuruman, (South Aftrica), and wrote the first book in the local language of Setswana;  “Bechuana Spelling Book and A Bechuana Catechism.” He then translated the entire Bible into Setswana.

The book has no date but a copy on the internet is marked as 1883 just after his death. The inside cover has a prize label marked 1934/5.

Reading the book, published by National Sunday School Union  and of this age shows, and writes for the audience who would be mainly British and Christian. The book is for a younger audience, and details his hard life and good Christian work. It appears sanitised for the audience, and more detail of his hard life would have been better.

By the end of the book, one is fond of the old man who gave his life to spread the Good News, and shared his sadness of family deaths and sees him as a good caring man.

For me, the book is too short, I feel and could have had more detail. I wanted to learn more about him, more about the conditions he lived, and even more information about the people he lived among. It would read as too heavy for modern children but too sanitised for adults.

Verdict: Good book for those with little or no knowledge of Moffat but not for all readers.

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